The End Of The Throwaway Culture

Capitalism’s own demise is approaching at a fast pace and Degrowth is about to replace the “throwaway culture” that got us into this global mess. This drastic shift evidences that capitalism cannot fix itself because profit-seeking is what makes the market choosing pillage over humanity’s welfare in the first place.

Competition inherently originates from the notion of value, which cannot exist without property/ownership rights. We cannot even really own our own body because we are part of (supranatural) biosystems. We are so dependent on biodiversity. Nobody can own the Universe because our purpose is to participate in its perpetual creation.

If anything we can think of was manufactured while taking into account the impact on the environment, addressing slave (and minimum wages) and durability Wallstreet would go broke overnight and getting rich would reveal itself as an illusion, meaning that the concept of wealth is not only unethical but completely irrational to start with.

The illusion is crashing down because of Knowledge, the more knowledge the more humility and sense of the whole we must have. Wealth accumulation is a notion invented by a mentality praising “hierarchy” and instigated by a top-down. And as now we can see, we have spent 4,000 years empowering a mirage. The price tag for this mistake will be tremendous.

The shift is going to be painful, but we can minimize the latter if we voluntarily agree to let go of that obsolete thinking and embrace the “sharing culture”, accept Degrowth as a reality and get ready to the end of money itself. Obviously we cannot fix the problem with the same money-making mentality that creates it.

Climate change: New rules could spell end of ‘throwaway culture’ (MARCH 2020)

BBC: New rules could spell the death of a “throwaway” culture in which products are bought, used briefly, then binned. The regulations will apply to a range of everyday items such as mobile phones, textiles, electronics, batteries, construction and packaging. They will ensure products are designed and manufactured so they last – and so they’re repairable if they go wrong. It’s part of a worldwide movement called the Right to Repair, which has spawned citizens’ repair workshops in several UK cities. The rules will also fight what is known as “premature obsolescence”, the syndrome in which manufacturers make goods with deliberately low lifespan to force consumers into buying a newer model. But the EEB complains that the package should go even further by setting waste prevention targets for businesses and industries, and setting goals for reducing resource use overall across Europe.
full article: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51825089

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